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All about Conn's syndrome (primary hyperaldosteronism) causes of Conn's syndrome symptoms of Conn's syndrome (primary hyperaldosteronism) diagnosis of Conn's syndrome treatments for Conn's syndrome

How is Conn's syndrome (primary hyperaldosteronism) diagnosed?

Conn's syndrome should be suspected in all patients with high blood pressure. Traditional teaching has been to limit investigation for Conn's syndrome to patients who have a low blood potassium, or in whom blood pressure which is moderate to severe (>160/110mmHg), or is difficult to control with medication. However, using these criteria, many patients with Conn's syndrome will not be diagnosed. For example, about 40 per cent of patients with proven Conn's syndrome have normal blood potassium levels.

The most rigorous method of diagnosis is to measure the blood levels of two hormones: aldosterone and renin (which plays a role in stimulating aldosterone production). In Conn's syndrome, the aldosterone level is elevated and the renin level is low or undetectable.


More information on Conn's syndrome (primary hyperaldosteronism)

What is Conn's syndrome? - Conn's syndrome is a disease of the adrenal glands involving excess production of a hormone, called aldosterone. Another name for the condition is primary hyperaldosteronism.
What causes primary hyperaldosteronism? - The most common cause of Conn's syndrome is an aldosterone-producing tumor of the adrenal gland.
What are the symptoms of Conn's syndrome - Symptoms of Conn's syndrome include high blood pressure, headache, tiredness, and excessive urination (often during the night).
How is Conn's syndrome diagnosed? - Conn's syndrome should be suspected in all patients with high blood pressure. The most rigorous method of diagnosis is to measure the blood levels of two hormones.
What're the treatments for Conn's syndrome? - Conn's syndrome resulting from a tumor is usually treated by removing an adrenal gland (unilateral adrenalectomy). 
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Topics in endocrine disorders

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Conn's syndrome
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